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Tim Botts Calligraphy > GOSPEL SONGS
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Amen - #505

From Timothy's newest book, "Bound for Glory", a celebration of African American spirituals and gospel songs through expressive calligraphy.


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Deep River - #1173

DEEP RIVER
My home is over Jordan Lord,
I want to cross over into campground
Oh, children don't you want to go
to that promised land where all is peace?
Walk into heaven and cast my crown at Jesus feet


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Down by the Riverside - #510

"Down by the Riverside" (also known as "Ain't Gonna Study War No More") is a traditional gospel song. It has a long history and was known in Civil War times. It was sung by both whites and blacks. The line "I ain't goin" to study war no mo" perhaps originated about this time. Slaves from the American South adopted this song as a work song and added many lines to it from other spirituals. It has endured far into modern times with little changes since.


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Every Time I Feel the Spirit - #511

This is another popular song classified as an African-American, or Negro, spiritual, a genre of traditional song that was the product of slaves living in the southern United States in the pre-Civil War era. Like most of their other spirituals, "Every Time I Feel the Spirit" was inspired by a Biblical verse (Galatians 4:6). And also like so many, its words signified more to the slaves than the Biblical passage would convey to white or other free Americans from that era.


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Free at Last - #1174

Free at Last
by Dr. Martin Luther King

You can hinder me here
but you can't hinder me there
free at last
The Lord in Heaven's
goin' to answer my prayer
free at last
I went in the valley
but I didn't go to stay
Thank God Almighty
My soul got happy
and i stayed all day
I'm free at last


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Go Tell it on the Mountain - #512

"Go Tell it on the Mountain" was born in the oral culture of African slaves in the American south. It was embraced by the civil rights movement in the 1960's. Today it is a perennial favorite at Christmas concerts and church services across North America. The spiritual "Go Tell It on the Mountain" has come to mean many things depending on the time and place in which it is sung - freedom anthem, hymn of faith, a simple song of Christmas.


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He's Got the Whole World - #513

This traditional song is said to have been inspired by the Biblical quotation "In His Hands is the life of every living thing and the breath of all mankind" from Job 12:10. Some who sing "He's Got the Whole World" in churches or during religious revivals classify it as a spiritual instead of traditional song. There are several versions of it, although thematically each sounds nearly identical. The most common renditions begin with the title words "He's got the whole world in his hands".


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His Eye Is on the Sparrow - #503

Early in the spring of 1905, my husband and I were sojourning in Elmira, New York. We contracted a deep friendship for a couple by the name of Mr. and Mrs. Doolittle -- true saints of God. Mrs. Doolittle had been bedridden for nigh twenty years. Her husband was an incurable cripple who had to propel himself to and from his business in a wheel chair. Despite their afflictions, they lived happy Christian lives, bringing inspiration and comfort to all who knew them.


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I Got Shoes - #509

For obvious reasons, direct expressions of protest during slavery were dangerous. Yet, it is very clear that some of the songs created by enslaved people served as expressions of protest. Creators of the songs went to considerable lengths to disguise the true meaning of the lyrics. For those within the enslaved community, however, the meanings were very clear. The best example of a protest spiritual is the song commonly called "I Got Shoes," but also known as "Heav'n, Heav'n."


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I Want Jesus to Walk With Me - #1175

I want Jesus to walk with me
All along my pilgrim Journey
In my sorrow Lord
Walk with me
When my heart is aching
Walk with me


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Jacob's Ladder - #508

Rise, Shine, Give God Glory
If you Love Him, why not Serve Him?
Every round goes Higher, Higher
We are climbing Jacob's Ladder
Solders of the Cross


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Let My People Go - #1176

When they had reached the other shore
They sang a song of triumph o'er
When Israel was is in Egypt land
Oppressed so hard they could not stand
The Lord told Moses what to do
To lead the children of Israel through
As Israel stood by the waterside
At the command of God did divide
GO DOWN MOSES
WAY DOWN IN EGYPT LAND
TELL OLD PHARAOH
LET MY PEOPLE GO


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Let Us Break Bread Together on our Knees - #514

From Timothy's newest book, "Bound for Glory", a celebration of African American spirituals and gospel songs through expressive calligraphy.


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Lord, I want to be a Christian - #515

From Timothy's newest book, "Bound for Glory", a celebration of African American spirituals and gospel songs through expressive calligraphy.


$17.00

My Lord What a Morning - #1177

My Lord what a morning
When the stars begin to fall
You'll hear the trumpet sound
to wake the nations underground
Looking to my God's right hand


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Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen - #504

This is an African-American spiritual probably dating to the first half of the nineteenth century. These songs of a religious nature were composed by slaves living in the southern United States prior to and during the Civil War. Their text often contained hidden messages about escape to the North or to Canada or was a veiled protest against slavery. This song, however, expresses only the pain suffered by the slaves, while, of course, offering hope to them through fervent Christian belief. Its me


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Rock-a-My Soul - #506

From Timothy's newest book, "Bound for Glory", a celebration of African American spirituals and gospel songs through expressive calligraphy.


$17.00

Somebody's Knockin' - #1178

Somebody's knockin' at your door,
O sinner, why donít you answer?
Somebody's knockin' at your door.

Knocks like Jesus,
Somebody's knockin' at your door.
Knocks like Jesus,

Somebody's knockin' at your door.
O sinner, why donít you answer?
Somebody's knockin' at your door.

Can't you hear Him?
Somebody's knockin' at your door.
Can't you hear Him?


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Sometimes I Feel - #1179

Sometimes I feel like
a motherless child
a long way from home


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Swing Low, Sweet Chariot - #507

H.L. Mencken once suggested that the same unknown genius who wrote this beloved song also penned "Deep River" and "Roll, Jordan, Roll." "He was one of the greatest poets we have ever produced, and he came so near being our greatest musician that I hesitate to look for a match for him." Perhaps awaiting some future revelation, the identity of this currently anonymous creator may be uncovered by bits and pieces of information surrounding his work.


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There is a Balm in Gilead - #516

"There is a Balm in Gilead" is a well-known traditional African-American spiritual. The "balm in Gilead" is a reference from the Old Testament, but the lyrics of this spiritual refer to the New Testament concept of salvation through Jesus Christ. The Balm of Gilead is interpreted as a spiritual medicine that is able to heal Israel (and sinners in general). In the Old Testament, the balm of Gilead is taken most directly from Jeremiah 8:22: "Is there no balm in Gilead? Is there no physician t


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This Little Light of Mine - #517

"This Little Light of Mine" is a gospel children's song written by Harry Dixon Loes (1895-1965) in about 1920. Loes, who studied at the Moody Bible Institute and the American Conservatory of Music, was a musical composer, and teacher, who wrote, and co-wrote, several other gospel songs. The song has since entered the folk tradition, first being collected by John Lomax in 1939. Even though it's become a great anthem of the Civil Rights movement, it's not believed to have hailed from slave sp


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Wade in the Water - #1180

Wade in the water children
God's a' going to trouble the water
See that host all dressed in white
The leader looks like the Israelite
See that band all dressed in red
Looks like the band that Moses led
Look over yonder what do I see?
The Holy Ghost a' coming on me
Wade in the water


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When the Saints - #502

This song is really a traditional spiritual and almost certainly has roots in Afro-American music from the nineteenth century. It may, in fact, have origins with the slaves in the southern United States, who were said to have sung early versions of it at funerals of fellow slaves. When the tradition of jazz bands marching in funeral processions through New Orleans" streets began, the melody to "When the Saints Go Marching In" was frequently played and grew in popularity. That tune is one of t


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